States Spend Less Than 2% of Tobacco Settlement Money on Anti-Smoking Campaigns

This qualifies for placement in the Public Health Hall of Infamy.

The report blasted states for failing to reverse the budget cuts to tobacco prevention programs that occurred after that time, calling them even more problematic in light of recent surveys that show smoking declines in the U.S. have slowed.

Across the country, 19% of adults and 18% of high school students still smoke, those surveys show.

The $460 million being spent this year amounts to just 12.4% of the $3.7 billion that the CDC recommends on tobacco prevention spending for all states combined.

It would take less than 15% of total state tobacco revenues to fund programs at CDC-recommended levels, according to the report.

Only two states – Alaska and North Dakota – will fund tobacco prevention programs at CDC-recommended levels, while only three – Delaware, Wyoming, and Hawaii – will spend at half the recommended level, the report said.

Four states — New Hampshire, New Jersey, North Carolina, and Ohio — have allotted no state funds for tobacco prevention programs next year.