Southern (and Some Northern) States Choose to Leave Millions of Their Citizens Uninsured

This intransigence will bring with it a great deal of unnecessary suffering, death and, not so incidentally, economic hardship in its wake. Will they change their minds eventually? Only if their own citizens force them to.

From the Institute of Southern Studies:

But in Rome, 27 percent of adults under 65 are uninsured, a rate that holds true across the state. Last year, the city’s two hospitals report spending more than $80 million delivering uncompensated care, often in the emergency room, where costs run high. Taxpayers and those with health insurance will end up paying for that care through government subsidies and higher premiums, industry experts say.

Rome’s dilemma is exactly the situation that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as “Obamacare,” was designed to fix — but that fix isn’t coming to Georgia.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act provides for expansion of insurance coverage for low-income and middle-class adults, with the goal of reducing the $41 billion spent covering uninsured care each year.

A key provision, set to kick in on Jan. 1, 2014, offers states federal funding to expand Medicaid coverage to all adults making up to 133 percent of the poverty line, or $25,975 for a family of three. In Georgia, over half of that group is uninsured.

But in the Deep South and Florida, Republican governors and state legislatures have turned down the funding, citing cost concerns and philosophical opposition to the safety net insurance program, which was signed into law on July 30, 1965. In Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina and Florida, the move will exclude 2.7 million low-income residents from Medicaid eligibility, according to the Urban Institute.

“In Georgia, these people are the working poor,” said Dr. Leonard Reeves, a family physician in Rome who volunteers at the city’s privately-funded free clinic. “I had an uninsured patient in his late 30s who worked every day of his life, and one day he finally came in when he felt he couldn’t go on any more.”

Dr. Reeves diagnosed the man, who was married and worked part-time as a forklift operator, with diabetes, but it was too late for insulin. After years without basic treatment, his kidneys had failed, and he needed weekly dialysis treatments to stay alive.

“He’s now on disability,” said Dr. Reeves. “If he’d had that insurance, he’d still be paying into the tax rolls instead of taking from them. There’s an old saying — ‘An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.’ And that’s exactly what we’re talking about here.”