About Daniel Redwood

Daniel Redwood, DC, is Director of the Master of Science in Human Nutrition and Functional Medicine program at the University of Western States. He is Associate Editor of Topics in Integrative Healthcare and a member of the American Chiropractic Association's editorial advisory board. He lives in Portland, Oregon.

Bayer’s Neonic Pesticides Linked to Colony Collapse Disorder in Bees

Few things, if any, have the potential to cause the level of catastrophic health effects in humans that would attend a substantial spread of colony collapse disorder. Most of the food eaten by the world’s humans relies on pollination by bees. Without them, most of the grains and fruits we eat would only be available in far smaller quantities.

Thus, when three new studies in prestigious journals implicate Bayer’s neonic pesticides in colony collapse disorder, the implications are huge. Essentially the entire U.S. corn crop is grown using that pesticide. Organically grown corn is the exception; even then, however, if pesticides are blown by the wind or carried by water into organic fields, that safe haven vanishes.

Last year, the Whole Foods stores in my area carried no organic corn. Except for organic farmer’s markets or growing it yourself, there’s no other option around here. And this is in the heart of the Midwest.

As Tom Philpott notes at the end of this article from Mother Jones, this situation cries out for regulatory action. Thus far, the Obama Administration has shown no inclination to take on corporate agriculture. What would it take for that to change?

It’s springtime, and farmers throughout the Midwest and South are preparing to plant corn—and lots of it. The USDA projects this year’s corn crop will cover 94 million acres, the most in 68 years. (By comparison, the state of California occupies a land mass of about 101 million acres.) Nearly all of that immense stand of corn will be planted with seeds treated with neonicotinoid pesticides produced by the German chemical giant Bayer.

And that may be very bad news for honey bees, which remain in a dire state of health, riddled by large annual die-offs that have become known as “colony collapse disorder” (CCD). 

In the past months, three separate studies—two of them just out in the prestigious journal Science—have added to a substantial body of literature linking widespread use of neonicotinoids to CCD. The latest research will renew pressure on the EPA to reconsider its registration of Bayer’s products. The EPA green-lighted Bayer’s products based largely on a study funded by the chemical giant itself—which was later discredited by the EPA’s own scientists, as this leaked memo shows.

 

 

Doctors Urge Their Colleagues to Quit Doing Worthless Tests

This is a very difficult policy to implement as long as doctors and hospitals continue to be paid more when they perform more procedures. Radiology departments are major profit centers for hospitals and other health care facilities.

To see major medical groups such as the American Board of Internal Medicine endorse this policy is heartening. I would add that my profession, chiropractic, has made major changes along these lines within our educational institutions over the last decade. Student interns cannot routinely x-ray patients; for imaging studies to be approved, specific guidelines (such as the Canadian Cervical Spine Rule) must be followed.

Nine national medical groups are launching a campaign called Choosing Wisely to get U.S. doctors to back off on 45 diagnostic tests, procedures and treatments that often may do patients no good.

Many involve imaging tests such as CT scans, MRIs and X-rays. Stop doing them, the groups say, for most cases of back pain, or on patients who come into the emergency room with a headache or after a fainting spell, or just because somebody’s about to undergo surgery.

The Choosing Wisely project was launched last year by the foundation of the American Board of Internal Medicine. It recruited nine medical specialty societies representing more than 376,000 physicians to come up with five common tests or procedures “whose necessity … should be questioned and discussed.”

The groups represent family physicians, cardiologists, radiologists, gastroenterologists, oncologists, kidney specialists and specialists in allergy, asthma and immunology and nuclear cardiology.

Eight more specialty groups will join the campaign this fall, representing hospice doctors, head and neck specialists, arthritis doctors, geriatricians, pathologists, hospital practitioners, nuclear medicine specialist and those who perform a heart test called echocardiography.

Consumer groups are involved, too. Led by Consumer Reports, they include the AARP, National Business Coalition on Health, the Wikipedia community and eight others.

The effort represents a growing sense that there’s a lot of waste in U.S. health care, and that many tests and treatments are not only unnecessary but harmful.

Harvard economist David Cutler estimates that a third of what this country spends on health care could safely be dispensed with.

h/t Stephen Perle

Homebirth Midwives: Better Outcomes, Moving Toward Broader Acceptance

From John Weeks in the Huffington Post, positive news from out west:

“Midwives have a central focus in our strategic plan. We are hoping Washington State can double out-of-facility births in the next two or three years.”

The speaker was Jeff Thompson, M.D., MPH, chief medical officer of the state of Washington’s Medicaid program. He spoke in a taped interview for Symposium 2012 — Certified Professional Midwives and Midwifery Educators: Contributing to a New Era in Maternity Care. The gathering took place at Warrenton, Va.’s Airlie Center on March 18, 2012.

Thompson, a member of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality, works in the state with the most evidence-based exploration of the value and risks associated with direct-entry, licensed, non-nurse, midwives. His state’s heightened interest began with a state requirement in 1996 that health plans cover midwives. Washington, like 11 other states, presently also covers midwives via Medicaid.

If the certified professional midwives (CPMs) get their way in Congress, CPM services will be reimbursed by Medicaid in all 26 states where CPMs are licensed. Passage would significantly expand access to low-income women across the country. The Access to Certified Professional Midwives Act was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives in 2011 by Congresswoman Chellie Pingree (D-ME). Passage would energize a slight bump in home births captured in recent data from the Centers for Disease Control.

When the Supposedly Safer Alternative Appears to be More Dangerous

This is a fascinating and meaningful research project by my friend, Sarina Farb.

Though only a high school senior, she is pursuing a line of research that has the potential to prevent a great deal of illness and suffering from these apparently dangerous environmental chemicals (BPA and BPS) to which we are all exposed.

Farb noticed that the Lawrence Public Library and The Merc promote BPA-free receipts, as BPA is used in the ink and found on the surface of receipts. Studies have suggested that the BPA found on receipts is absorbed into the body when handled.

So instead, the receipts at The Merc and the library contain BPS, or bisphenol S, which is similar to BPA. However, very few studies have examined whether BPS is any safer than BPA. So Farb set off to find out.

Farb talked her way into a lab at Kansas University, and with the assistance of Kristi Neufeld, a molecular biology professor, obtained some lab space and the necessary testing supplies.

Farb spent “hundreds of hours” over the past year testing whether BPA and BPS cause an increase in the growth of breast cancer cells.

The results?

“BPS is worse,” said Farb, as her results showed that BPS caused more growth in the breast cancer cells than BPA.

New Evidence That Meditation Strengthens the Brain

This new study adds to the mounting evidence that meditation, particularly when practiced regularly for years, is health-affirming in a variety of ways.

From Science Daily:

Earlier evidence out of UCLA suggested that meditating for years thickens the brain (in a good way) and strengthens the connections between brain cells. Now a further report by UCLA researchers suggests yet another benefit.

Eileen Luders, an assistant professor at the UCLA Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, and colleagues, have found that long-term meditators have larger amounts of gyrification (“folding” of the cortex, which may allow the brain to process information faster) than people who do not meditate. Further, a direct correlation was found between the amount of gyrification and the number of meditation years, possibly providing further proof of the brain’s neuroplasticity, or ability to adapt to environmental changes.

h/t Amrita McLanahan, MD

Sugar Babies

A story that illustrates well the ways diet can influence children’s behavior. The author’s honesty and her willingness to rethink her own actions are what makes this blog post a standout.

The transformation happened in mere minutes. My 3-year-old nephew listed against me as we stood in a chilly, wet schoolyard, waiting for his 8-year-old sister. He popped the hood on his raincoat, rubbed his eyes, and lethargically complained about the cold.

When my niece emerged from her classroom, she handed her brother a sweet treat. One dark chocolate granola bar later, my nephew practically flew on the walk home, a textbook example of a “sugar rush” in action.

Cancer v. the Constitution

A human tragedy, which could become much less common or much more common depending on what the Supreme Court decides.

She hadn’t gone to the doctor because she had no health insurance. The only kind of work she could get in a struggling rural community was without benefits. Her coat and shoes beside the gurney were worn and her purse from another decade. She could never afford to buy it on her own. She didn’t qualify for Medicaid, the local doctor only took insurance, and there was no Planned Parenthood or County Clinic nearby.

So nothing was done about the bleeding until she passed out at work and someone called an ambulance. She required a couple of units of blood at the local hospital before they sent her by ambulance to our emergency department.

I looked at the fungating mass on her cervix. Later the Intern wondered why she hadn’t picked up on the smell. Probably a combination of it being so gradual and denial. It’s amazing what people learn to tolerate when their options are limited.

“I’m very sorry to tell you this looks like a cancer of the cervix,” I said

She looked surprised. “Oh.” She paused in silence as she adjusted to the news. And then quietly she added, “But the doctor back home said you could fix me up. He said you can offer free care because you have the university.”

But we didn’t have free care at the university hospital.

h/t Meteor Blades

Study Confirms Weight Loss Surgery Benefit for Diabetics

This new research confirms what was strongly suggested by earlier studies — that bariatric surgery leads to major weight loss, and either directly or indirectly leads to major improvements in the diabetic status of these formerly obese individuals.

I’ve lectured on this topic in my clinical nutrition class and it generally stimulates fruitful class dicsussion. Essentially, we’re looking at a dangerous condition that is almost entirely preventable through diet and exercise. We then see tens of millions of people failing at prevention and then finding themselves in a terrible situation. Once they’ve reached that point, this surgery clearly leads to much improved outcomes. It’s a classic example of radical measures being offered at a late stage for something that should never have reached that point.

It concerns me that we are now seeing, for what to my knowledge is the first time, a serious suggestion that bariatric surgery be provided to diabetics who are even slightly overweight. Again, where is the prevention?

The following quotes are from the National Public Radio coverage of the story, which I’m citing because unlike the MedPage story cited above, this one mentions recommending this surgery for diabetics with a Body Mass Index as low as 26, which is just barely overweight. (Obesity starts at a BMI of 30, and morbid obesity, which is usually when bariatric surgery is provided, starts at a BMI of 40).

This research raises an important question: Should diabetics start getting this operation more often? Paul Zimmet of the International Diabetes Federation, who co-authored an editorial accompanying the studies, thinks they should.

“Diabetes coupled with obesity is probably the largest epidemic in human history. At the moment, bariatric surgery is seen as a last resort. And it should be offered earlier in management,” Zimmet said in a telephone interview.

But others aren’t so sure. The new studies followed only about 200 patients. And while the operations appear to be pretty safe, there can be complications. And the complications can be serious.

“I think we need longer-term follow-up than what was done in these studies to make sure you’re not trading one problem for another,” said Vivian Fonseca of the American Diabetes Association.

Researchers are now testing whether the surgery works on diabetics who aren’t even obese — people with BMIs as low as 26. And doctors and patients are waiting to see if insurance companies will pay for the operations just to treat diabetes.

Earlier this year, I attended (and spoke) at a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services listening session here in Kansas City that focused on what services should be included in an essential benefits package under health reform. For me, the most unexpected part of the event was that of perhaps 30 presenters, four were bariatric surgeons. I was surprised, in part, because I was aware of the research supporting bariatric surgery and had assumed they were in no danger of being excluded.

Now, in light of this new research that was certainly in the pipeline at the time of the hearing, it occurs to me that their presence (which I assume will be duplicated in many other venues), may have been part of a concerted push for a major expansion of their services into the non-obese market.

Pink Slime Surprisingly Unpopular for School Lunch Menus

Who could have guessed?

Today’s New York Times has an up-to-the-minute pink slime report. Apparently, this is a fast-moving story.

The Miami-Dade school district, one of the nation’s largest, has already said it would opt for pink-slime-free beef, even though it expected it to cost more (exactly how much remained uncertain). State officials in South Carolina said they would procure only the pink-slime-free ground beef once it became available.

But for some school districts — with administrators fielding phone calls from concerned parents and fretting about past food scares — next fall is not soon enough. The Boston school district, among others, has taken the step of purging all ground beef from its menus. Other districts, like the New York City schools, have begun phasing out ground beef containing the additive from their lunchrooms.

Michael Peck, the director of food and nutrition services for the Boston schools, said the district had decided to hold and isolate its entire inventory of ground beef, leaving over 70,000 pounds of beef — worth about $500,000, Mr. Peck estimated — confined to a warehouse until the district knows more about what is in it.

“It’s another example of the alteration of our food supply,” said Mr. Peck, who is concerned about the use of ammonia hydroxide gas to kill bacteria in the product. “Have we created another unknown safety risk?”

The district will put the meat back into circulation if it finds that it is free of the filler, but like many districts, it is frustrated by the difficulty of determining what does and does not contain lean finely textured beef, which does not have to be listed as an ingredient.

“It does speak to the U.S.D.A.’s ability to trace,” Mr. Peck said. He added that the ground beef would be donated or thrown out if the district found that it contained pink slime.

… in the Real World

This Washington Monthly blog post, “The Affordable Care Act in the Real World,” frames the question in ways that should matter most, in terms of how people’s lives are actually affected by the health reform law.

A priest I knew many years ago once said to me, “Turning real human suffering into an abstraction is among the greatest sins.” .

My children now have health coverage through mine, and our family’s health will now sustain itself through my children’s 26th birthdays. A mouth full of cavities was treated, and vision has been a godsend, and my daughters have the ability to go to the doctor at $20 a pop, instead of the $150 a pop uninsured rate, and they don’t have to go willy-nilly to a clinic setting!

A dear friend of mine skirted death with a ruptured colon, had surgery to the tune of over $80,000 because they were uninsured. and worried about preexisting conditions when it came to reversing the colostomy, qualified for insurance so he doesn’t have to carry around a bag for the rest of his life.

Amen.